Preview (5 of 14 pages)

Preview Extract

Chapter 5 Nonverbal Communication 5.1 Multiple Choice Questions 1) Communication, which encompasses the broad spectrum of messages we send without verbalizing our thoughts or feelings, is a) nonverbal. b) intentional. c) unintentional. d) personal. Answer: a Rationale: Nonverbal communication includes gestures, facial expressions, body language, eye contact, posture, and other forms of communication that do not involve words. 2) While stuck in traffic, Marta could not tell whether the police officer was signaling her forward or telling her to turn right. This is because nonverbal communication is a) intentional. b) unintentional. c) ambiguous. d) territorial. Answer: c Rationale: Nonverbal communication can often be ambiguous, especially in situations where gestures or signals can have multiple meanings or are unclear. 3) In some Middle Eastern counties, touching someone with one’s left hand is viewed as insulting. This is because touch is a) territorial. b) culturally bound. c) space related. d) multi-channeled. Answer: b Rationale: The meaning of touch varies across cultures, and what is considered appropriate or insulting can be culturally specific. 4) When Sheila and Dave sit across the table from each other in a restaurant booth, they are sitting at a (n) ____ distance. When they sit side-by-side on the same seat, they are sitting at a (n) _____ distance. a) intimate/personal b) social/public c) public/personal d) personal/ intimate Answer: d Rationale: Sitting across the table is a personal distance, while sitting side-by-side on the same seat is an intimate distance. 5) When Raj arrived an hour late for his first date with Anita in a pair of sweats, without so much as a call to warn her of the delay, Anita realized Raj was not the one for her. Raj’s nonverbal behavior was a) multi-channeled. b) culturally bound. c) regulative. d) adaptive. Answer: a Rationale: Raj's behavior involved multiple nonverbal cues, including arriving late, his choice of clothing, and not communicating about the delay, all of which contributed to Anita's perception of him. 6) What type of non-verbal communication concerns a person’s voice pitch, volume, rate, and quality? a) Paraphrasing b) Paralanguage c) Parallelism d) Paraphernalia Answer: b Rationale: Paralanguage refers to the vocal aspects of nonverbal communication, including tone of voice, pitch, volume, and speech rate. 7) Jim and Nancy went out for Italian food for Valentine’s Day. When dessert arrived, Jim hid an engagement ring inside the chocolate cake. After she found the ring and responded to Jim’s marriage proposal, tears flowed down Nancy’s cheeks. What type of nonverbal communication do Nancy’s tears represent? a) Affect displays b) Emblems c) Adaptors d) Regulators Answer: a Rationale: Nancy's tears are an example of an affect display, which is a nonverbal expression of emotion. 8) Chronemics is the study of a) space. b) touch. c) time. d) gestures. Answer: c Rationale: Chronemics is the study of how time is used in communication, including the role of time in structuring interactions and relationships. 9) Sounds such as “like,” “uh,” “um,” and “you know” are examples of a) kinesics. b) regulators. c) affect displays. d) fillers. Answer: d Rationale: Fillers are vocalizations or verbalizations used in speech to fill pauses or gaps, such as "like," "uh," "um," and "you know." 10) At the Little League softball game, the umpire threw her arms straight out signaling the runner was safe at home plate. This is an example of what type of nonverbal communication? a) Emblem b) Illustrator c) Regulator d) Adaptor Answer: a Rationale: Emblems are gestures that have a specific, conventionalized meaning, such as the umpire's signal for safe at home plate. 11) Kinesics is the study of a) space. b) eye movement. c) bodily movements. d) language. Answer: c Rationale: Kinesics is the study of body movements, including gestures, facial expressions, and posture, as a form of nonverbal communication. It does not specifically relate to space, eye movement, or language. 12) Yawning at someone’s boring story is a nonverbal behavior called a (n) a) regulator. b) affect display. c) illustrator. d) emblem. Answer: a Rationale: Regulators are nonverbal behaviors used to control the flow of conversation. Yawning can be a way to signal disinterest or fatigue and can serve as a regulator to indicate the desire to end a conversation or change the topic. 13) A mother is hugging her one-year-old son and giving him kisses on the cheek. What type of personal space is she demonstrating? a) Social distance b) Intimate distance c) Public distance d) Personal distance Answer: b Rationale: Intimate distance is typically reserved for close relationships, such as between family members or intimate partners, and ranges from 0 to 18 inches. The actions described indicate a close, intimate relationship. 14) The study of physical space as it relates to human interaction is called a) proxemics. b) kinesics. c) tactics. d) logistics. Answer: a Rationale: Proxemics is the study of how people use and perceive space in their interactions with others. It focuses on the physical distance between individuals in different contexts and cultures. 15) The professor who speaks in front of her classroom of 30 students is most likely standing at a(n) __________ distance. a) intimate b) personal c) social d) public Answer: c Rationale: Social distance ranges from 4 to 12 feet and is typically used in formal interactions, such as between a speaker and an audience. The distance described is appropriate for a classroom setting. 16) Space that is approximately 18 inches to 4 feet is usually appropriate for interpersonal interactions dealing with personal matters and identified as a) intimate distance. b) public distance. c) social distance. d) personal distance. Answer: d Rationale: Personal distance ranges from 1.5 to 4 feet and is often used in conversations with close friends or family members. It allows for more personal interactions while still maintaining a comfortable distance. 17) Dean nervously taps his foot on the tile floor while waiting to be called for his upcoming job interview. This is an example of what nonverbal behavior? A) Illustrators B) Adaptors C) Regulators D) Emblems Answer: b Rationale: Adaptors are nonverbal behaviors that occur in response to internal or external stimuli, such as tapping a foot when nervous. They are often subconscious and can reveal underlying emotions or feelings. 18) Not using your voice is known as what kind of paralanguage? a) Silence b) Vocal interruptions c) Fillers d) Proxemics Answer: a Rationale: Paralanguage refers to nonverbal elements of speech, such as tone, pitch, and pace. Silence, or the absence of vocalization, can also be a form of paralanguage that conveys meaning or emotion. 19) A distance exceeding 12 feet is considered to be what kind of distance? a) Public b) Personal c) Intimate d) Social Answer: a Rationale: Public distance ranges from 12 to 25 feet and is typically used in formal settings, such as public speaking or addressing a large audience. It is the furthest distance in Hall's proxemic theory. 20) Matt knows never to go into his older sister’s bedroom. He knows that her room is her a) chronemics. b) territory. c) physical setting. d) context. Answer: b Rationale: Territory refers to the personal space or area that an individual or group claims and defends as their own. Matt's sister's bedroom is her territory, and he respects this by not entering without permission. 5.2 Short Answer Questions 1) Nonverbal communication can be either ________ or ________; meaning we can either decide to send a message using our body, voice, or use of time, or send an unintentional message without knowledge. Answer: intentional/unintentional 2) Our use of nonverbal communication is one aspect that makes us unique because nonverbal behavior is Answer: culturally bound. 3) List at least five of the seven different types of nonverbal behavior mentioned in the textbook. Answer: The student should have five of these seven listed in their answer. 1. Bodily movements, kinesics 2. Touch 3. Paralanguage 4. Silence 5. Space, proxemics 6. Personal appearance 7. The use of time, chronemics 4) Bodily motions that take the place of words are called ________. Answer: emblems 5) ________ can be misleading because they do not always portray how we really feel. Answer: Affect displays 6) Marley is twirling her hair and rocking back and forth. What is this nonverbal behavior called? Answer: Adaptors 7) Proxemics is the study of ________ as it relates to human interaction. Answer: space 8) The U.S. Defense Department used this study of bodily movements to teach soldiers to hold their hands over their hearts while greeting local populations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Answer: Kinesics 9) The vocal aspects of delivery including pitch (tone), volume (loudness), rate (speed), and quality (richness of one’s voice) are part of which aspect of nonverbal communication? Answer: Paralanguage 10) The process of staking out a space to claim as your own relates to which communication aspect? Answer: Territory 5.3 True/False Questions 1) The meaning of nonverbal communication changes from culture to culture. Answer: True Rationale: Nonverbal communication includes gestures, facial expressions, body language, and other forms of communication that can vary greatly between cultures. What is considered appropriate or meaningful in one culture may be interpreted differently in another. 2) Emblems, illustrators, affect displays, regulators, and adaptors all fall under the category of kinesics. Answer: True Rationale: Kinesics is the study of body movements, including gestures and facial expressions, as forms of nonverbal communication. Emblems are gestures with specific meanings (e.g., thumbs up), illustrators accompany speech to clarify or emphasize (e.g., pointing), affect displays convey emotions (e.g., smiling or frowning), regulators control the flow of conversation (e.g., nodding), and adaptors are movements in response to physical or psychological needs (e.g., scratching). 3) A hitchhiker’s outstretched thumb is an example of an illustrator. Answer: False Rationale: An illustrator is a gesture that accompanies speech to clarify or emphasize. A hitchhiker's thumb gesture is more accurately classified as an emblem, as it has a specific, culturally understood meaning. 4) Mrs. Hill is unhappy at all the children running up and down the church pews during Pastor Allen’s sermon. Mrs. Hill frowns at all the parents who fail to keep their children in line. The frown represents an affect display. Answer: True Rationale: Affect displays are nonverbal behaviors that convey emotions, such as facial expressions. Mrs. Hill's frown indicates her disapproval or unhappiness, making it an affect display. 5) Pointing to his watch and saying, “Margaret, we’re running late and really need to leave now” is a nonverbal symbol called a regulator. Answer: False Rationale: This is an example of a verbal message combined with a nonverbal cue. The act of pointing to the watch is a nonverbal cue, but the verbal message "we're running late" is the regulator, as it is used to control or regulate the interaction. 6) The tight hug that accompanied Emily’s statement, “I’m so glad you’re home” is an example of an illustrator. Answer: True Rationale: In this context, the tight hug serves to emphasize or illustrate the speaker's emotion, which is the purpose of an illustrator. 7) Touch can be used to communicate affection, anger, and concern. Answer: True Rationale: Touch is a powerful form of nonverbal communication that can convey a wide range of emotions and intentions, including affection, anger, concern, comfort, and more. 8) Generally speaking, someone with a nasal or grating voice is easier to listen to than someone who has a resonant voice who is more annoying to listen to. Answer: False Rationale: A nasal or grating voice can be more difficult to listen to and may be perceived as annoying, while a resonant voice is generally considered more pleasant and easier to listen to. 9) Emotions such as sadness, fear, surprise, and anger MUST be communicated with words and not by using our faces. Answer: False Rationale: Facial expressions are a primary way to express emotions nonverbally, and emotions such as sadness, fear, surprise, and anger are often communicated through facial expressions without the need for words. 10) When we feel nervous in both interpersonal and public speaking situations we tend to speak more slowly. Answer: False Rationale: While some people may speak more slowly when nervous, others may speak more quickly or experience other speech changes. The response to nervousness can vary widely among individuals. 11) Silence can communicate uneasiness or discomfort as well as send a positive message. Answer: True Rationale: Silence can convey a range of meanings depending on the context and cultural norms. It can indicate uneasiness, discomfort, contemplation, agreement, or respect. In some cultures, silence is valued as a form of communication. 12) A boardroom business meeting, a family picnic, a literature study group meeting in a member’s home, and four couples enjoying an evening together playing bridge are all examples of situations where communication occurs at a public distance. Answer: False Rationale: Public distance in proxemics refers to the distance of 12 feet or more, which is typically used in public speaking situations or interactions with large groups of people. None of the situations described involve communication at such a distance. 13) Sometimes we wear clothing specially selected to project an image that is different from the one we have ourselves. Answer: True Rationale: Clothing is a form of nonverbal communication that can be used to convey identity, status, culture, personality, and mood. People often choose clothing to create a desired impression or image that may differ from their true selves. 14) Clothing does NOT communicate. Answer: False Rationale: Clothing is a powerful form of nonverbal communication that can convey a wide range of messages about a person, including their identity, status, culture, personality, mood, and intentions. The choice of clothing can communicate social, cultural, and personal information to others. 15) In the American culture, time is viewed as a thing we can buy and trade. Answer: True Rationale: In American culture, time is often seen as a commodity that can be bought, sold, and traded. This perspective is reflected in phrases like "time is money" and the prevalence of timemanagement strategies in business and personal life. 5.4 Matching Questions For the questions that follow, match the word or phrase with its meaning. a) Sounds used to fill in the gaps between words such as “you know” and “uh” b) The study of how we use time c) Signs of our emotional state d) Nonverbal behaviors that grow out of our discomfort e) The study of physical space as it relates to human interaction f) The study of how we use time g) Body motions that take the place of words h) Nonverbal symbols that reinforce a verbal message i) Nonverbal behaviors that attempt to control communication j) Nonverbal behavior that conveys a wide range of emotions k) The study of bodily movements 1) Adaptors 2) Affect displays 3) Kinesics 4) Emblems 5) Illustrator 6) Thought fillers 7) Proxemics 8) Regulators 9) Chronemics 10) Touch Answers: 1) d 2) c 3) k 4) g 5) h 6) a 7) e 8) I 9) f 10) j 5.5 Essay Questions 1) Define nonverbal communication. Explain why nonverbal language can be both intentional and unintentional. Give examples. Answer: Nonverbal communication is the broad spectrum of messages we send through bodily movements, space, touch, personal appearance, paralanguage, silence, and time. In others words, messages we send without verbalizing our thoughts or feelings. We can send nonverbal messages intentionally by using our bodies, voices, or our use of time. For example, Jim can give the “thumbs up” gesture with his hand and Mary will know that everything is okay. Mary can realize that Jim is upset, not so much by the words he speaks, but by the tone of his voice. Finally, Mary understands that Jim does not want to go to the opera because he is an hour late coming home from his friend’s house. He used time to communicate his displeasure at attending what he perceives as a boring musical program. Nonverbal communication also can be used unintentionally. For example, Mary is at a job interview. She is nervous. She projects this emotion through the shakiness of her voice. Although she is unaware of her actions, Mary’s arms and legs are crossed and she is swinging her leg back and forth as she is speaking to the interviewer. This communicates her discomfort with the interviewing situation. 2) Define touch. Explain why people react differently to touch. Answer: Touch is a form of nonverbal communication that conveys a wide range of emotions. It is often easier to show our feelings by touching someone than by finding the appropriate words to express our feelings. According to the authors, two variables play a role in the way touching is interpreted: our socialization and the context of the situation. First, how we are socialized affects the way we respond to touch. A person raised in a home where affectionate touching is frequent is probably more comfortable receiving and giving physical affection. A person from a family who is more reserved and touched less is probably more uncomfortable receiving or giving physical affection. The situation also affects touch. Giving or receiving a hug at a wedding or a funeral is probably more acceptable than giving a hug at a business meeting. 3) Our use of nonverbal communication is one aspect that makes us unique because nonverbal behavior is culturally bound. Identify the three ways cultures differ in nonverbal communication. Answer: Norms for display rules vary across cultures. Display rules govern when and where different kinds of nonverbal behavior are appropriate, required, or prohibited. Also, the range of nonverbal behaviors, or the repertoire, will vary by culture. Interpretation will also vary by culture making one appropriate nonverbal gesture in one country unacceptable or inappropriate in another country. Finally, touch, use of time, and space will vary in appropriateness and use by culture. We become better communicators when we are sensitive to these differences outside of our own frame-of-reference and make an effort to learn and incorporate what we learn when communicating in different cultural settings. 4) Define kinesics, proxemics, and chronemics. Within your definition of kinesics, list the five different types and give specific examples of each. Answer: Kinesics is the study of bodily movements. Emblems are body motions that take the place of words; like forming a “T” with your hands to symbolize “time-out.” Illustrators reinforce the verbal message; like slamming a door when someone says, “I don’t want to see you ever again.” Affect displays are nonverbal signs of our emotional state. We can use facial expressions to show many emotions without saying a word. Regulators are used to control, or regulate, communication between people. Students packing their book bags toward the end of class show they are ready for class to be concluded. Adaptors are used to help us cope with uncomfortable communication situations. Students shifting their feet back and forth while giving their first speech is usually an unconscious adaptor. Proxemics is the study of physical space as it relates to human interaction. Chronemics is the study of how we use time. 5) Define silence. How does silence communicate when nothing is said? Give an example of how silence communicates negatively and positively. Answer: Silence is the absence of using your voice. When we choose not to speak, we are sending a strong message to others. Silence can communicate anger, disappointment, embarrassment, uneasiness, discomfort, and even affection. By refusing to talk, we take control of the communication and assert our power. A negative example of silence is giving a significant other the “silent treatment.” Silence can also send a positive message. A positive example of silence can be to listen intently to someone as a show of respect. Silence can also be comforting and affirming when nothing has to be said. Test Bank for Communication: Embracing Difference Daniel M. Dunn, Lisa J. Goodnight 9780205943661, 9780205865635, 9781269602877

Document Details

Related Documents

Close

Send listing report

highlight_off

You already reported this listing

The report is private and won't be shared with the owner

rotate_right

Select menu by going to Admin > Appearance > Menus

Close
rotate_right
Close

Send Message

image
Close

My favorites

image
Close

Application Form

image
Notifications visibility rotate_right Clear all Close close
image
image
arrow_left
arrow_right