Preview (5 of 14 pages)

Preview Extract

Chapter 13 Organizing Your Speech 13.1 Multiple Choice Questions 1) Opal has developed a great way to gain the audience’s attention for her informative speech on tipping. Now she will begin to write the body of her speech. Opal “jumped the gun.” According to our text, it is best for Opal to begin developing her speech by first working on the a) body. b) transitional preview. c) transitional summary. d) conclusion. Answer: a Rationale: The body of the speech contains the main points and supporting information that develop the topic. It is essential to have a clear understanding of the content and structure of the body before working on other parts of the speech. 2) An element that helps create a logical flow of ideas is ______________, or order. a) sequence b) signpost c) summation d) subordinate point Answer: a Rationale: Sequence refers to the order in which ideas are presented. It helps to create a logical flow of ideas that the audience can easily follow and understand. 3) Arranging the ideas of your speech into spatial order means to A) identify the conflict and then offer a potential course of action that will correct the problem. B) break down the main topics into smaller points pertinent to the main idea. C) put ideas in a chronological framework. D) organize the parts of a topic according to the relationship or their positions. Answer: D Rationale: Spatial order organizes ideas based on their physical relationships or positions. This can be useful when describing a physical space or explaining the relationship between different elements. 4) “According to the December 3, 2012 issue of Time magazine, 3.37 million South African children under the age of 17 have lost one or both parents to AIDS. Sixty-four percent of those children are being raised by their grandmothers.” This speech introduction, meant to shock and arouse the audience, is called a a) quotation. b) rhetorical question. c) narrative. d) startling statement. Answer: d Rationale: A startling statement is used to grab the audience's attention by presenting them with surprising or shocking information. It is often used at the beginning of a speech to engage the audience from the start. 5) The major ideas in a speech outline are called a) introductory points. b) coordinate points. c) subordinate points. d) sub-coordinate points. Answer: b Rationale: Coordinate points are the main ideas or major topics in a speech outline. They provide the primary structure and direction for the speech. 6) Minor ideas that grow out of major ideas are called a) subordinate points. b) main points. c) minor points. d) coordinate points. Answer: a Rationale: Subordinate points are smaller ideas that support and expand upon the major ideas or main points in a speech. They help to provide depth and detail to the speech's content. 7) Bethany is preparing a speech on the topic of waste management. In the first part of her presentation, she will offer an explanation of the deplorable condition of our landfills. The second part of the speech will discuss recycling as a viable way to reduce the amount of waste destined for our landfills. What is this organizational pattern called? a) Chronological b) Problem/solution c) Causal d) Spatial Answer: b Rationale: The problem/solution organizational pattern is used to present a problem and then offer one or more solutions to address that problem. It is effective for persuasive speeches where the goal is to convince the audience to take a specific action. 8) Carrie looked over her key-phrase outline one more time to make sure that each idea in her outline could stand on its own and had the quality of being separate. This quality is called a) subordination. b) coordination. c) discreteness. d) organization. Answer: c Rationale: Discreteness refers to the quality of being separate or distinct. In a speech outline, each idea should be able to stand on its own and be clearly defined and distinct from other ideas. 9) The quality of being separate is known as a) sequence. b) discreteness. c) summation. d) concrete. Answer: b Rationale: Discreteness refers to the quality of being separate or distinct. In the context of a speech outline, it means that each idea is clearly defined and can stand on its own. 10) When Ben wrote his speech on cancer, he knew that getting his audience’s attention was crucial. He began his speech by saying, “Thousands of people die every year from cancer, yet people continue to smoke. Why when we are aware of the diseases smoking causes, do people continue this fatal act?” This attention-getter is known as what? a) Narrative b) Startling statement c) Rhetorical question d) Quotation Answer: c Rationale: A rhetorical question is a question that is asked for effect or to make a point, rather than to elicit a direct answer. It is often used as an attention-getter in speeches to engage the audience and encourage them to think about the topic. 11) For help in preparing and delivering your speech, use a key-phrase or full-sentence a) outline. b) sequence. c) summation. d) introduction. Answer: a Rationale: An outline helps to organize the content of the speech, ensuring that key points are included and presented in a logical order. It can also serve as a guide during the delivery of the speech. 12) In her persuasive speech, Cora exclaimed, “I ask you to stop buying canned tomatoes at the grocery store. Instead, I strongly urge you to can your own tomatoes at home. It is more economical, healthier, and a lot of fun.” Persuading her audience to can tomatoes at home is called a a) summation. b) call for action. c) challenge. d) solution. Answer: b Rationale: A call for action is a persuasive technique used to encourage the audience to take a specific action or change their behavior. 13) Eddie concluded his speech by saying, “This holiday season, think about how you can help the women and children who are living in Safe Haven’s battered women’s shelter.” This type of conclusion is known as a a) call for action. b) summation. c) challenge. d) transition. Answer: c Rationale: A challenge conclusion encourages the audience to think or act in a certain way, often by presenting them with a challenge or call to action. 14) In his speech, Sean stated, “This is the second year that I have been in the Best Buddies program, both as president, and as a buddy to my friend Tyler. In addition to having firsthand knowledge of the good work Best Buddies does, I have researched Best Buddies International for this assignment.” In this passage, Sean has a) established his credibility. b) reinforced his main points. c) created a signpost. d) called the audience to join. Answer: a Rationale: Sean is establishing his credibility by sharing his personal experience and research related to the topic of his speech, Best Buddies International. 15) After identifying his general purpose, specific purpose, and writing his thesis statement, Enrique wrote the following: I. Definition of mentoring II. Benefits of mentoring III. Opportunities for mentoring What part of the speech-writing process is this? a) Hypothesizing b) Ordering c) Outlining d) Practicing Answer: c Rationale: Enrique is creating an outline for his speech, which involves organizing his main points and supporting details in a structured format. 16) A conclusion that reinforces the main points of a speech is a a) reiteration. b) call for action. c) summation. d) challenge. Answer: c Rationale: A summation conclusion restates the main points of the speech to reinforce the message and leave a lasting impression on the audience. 17) A speaker who calls on the audience to think further about a topic is doing what? a) Calling for action b) Summarizing the main points c) Challenging the audience d) Advancing the solution Answer: c Rationale: By challenging the audience, the speaker is encouraging them to consider the topic more deeply or from a different perspective, stimulating further thought and reflection. 18) “In addition to the benefit of a lower cholesterol level, my second point further illustrates the importance of exercising for a healthy body.” This is an example of a) a transition. b) a subordinate point. c) a coordinate point. d) a signpost. Answer: a Rationale: This statement serves as a transition, linking the previous point about lower cholesterol to the next point about the importance of exercising for overall health. 19) “My second main point,” “In conclusion,” or “To conclude” are all examples of a) summations. b) signposts. c) discrete points. d) subordinate points. Answer: b Rationale: These phrases are examples of signposts, which help to guide the audience through the structure of the speech by indicating key points such as main points or the conclusion. 20) “Use this recycled fabric bag each time you go shopping instead of wasting another paper or plastic bag.” What kind of conclusion is this statement? a) Call for action b) Challenge c) Summation d) Sequence Answer: a Rationale: This statement is a call for action, urging the audience to take a specific action (using a recycled fabric bag) instead of another (using paper or plastic bags). 13.2 Short Answer Questions 1) Outlining the _____ of your speech helps you to fully develop the points made in your thesis statement. Answer: body 2) Organizing your speech on wine-making throughout California is an example of ________ order. Answer: spatial 3) Rosemary’s speech focused on events that were all linked to other events that preceded them. Rosemary used ________ order in organizing her speech. Answer: causal 4) Anna was doing a speech on the life of President John F. Kennedy. She decided to arrange her speech in a chronological framework, so her speech should follow a ________ order. Answer: time 5) Name three of the five organizational patterns that may be used when developing your speech. Answer: Identify three of five: causal order, problem/solution, spatial order, time order, and topic order. 6) The ________ points (Roman numerals) represent the major ideas of the talk, while the ________ points (letters) are minor points whose function is to support the major ideas. Answer: coordinate/subordinate 7) What are three objectives of the introduction? Answer: The student should list the following: 1. To capture the audience’s attention 2. To establish your credibility 3. To communicate the nature of your topic to the audience 8) Identify three specific transitions you can use to link the main parts of your speech. Answer: (1) transitional preview, (2) transitional summary, and (3) signpost 9) Identify two questions you can ask yourself when constructing your introduction that, once answered, will help you communicate your involvement in a topic. Answer: (1) How does this topic relate to my needs? (2) Why do I want to share my views with this audience? 10) What are the three functions of the conclusion? Answer: (1) to draw your speech to an end, (2) to reiterate the central theme of your presentation, and (3) to indicate what you want your audience members to do 13.3 True/False Questions 1) Although reinforcing the main points of a speech is one of the functions of the conclusion, using this specific approach is called a call-to-action. Answer: False Rationale: While reinforcing main points is a function of the conclusion, a call-to-action is a specific type of conclusion that urges the audience to take a specific action related to the speech topic. 2) When preparing a speech, create the body of the speech first. Answer: True Rationale: It is generally recommended to develop the body of the speech first, as it contains the main points and supporting details that form the core of the speech. 3) Causal order refers to organizing the parts of a topic according to the relationship of their positions. Answer: False Rationale: Causal order refers to organizing ideas based on cause-and-effect relationships, not the physical positions of the ideas. 4) The problem-solution approach to organizing your speech involves breaking down your main topic into smaller points that are pertinent to the main idea. Answer: False Rationale: The problem-solution approach involves presenting a problem and then offering one or more solutions to address that problem, rather than breaking down the main topic into smaller points. 5) Spatial order can be geographic, rank ordered, or directional. Answer: True Rationale: Spatial order organizes ideas based on their physical relationships or positions, which can include geographic, rank ordered, or directional organization. 6) Time order arranges ideas in a chronological framework. Answer: True Rationale: Time order organizes ideas based on their sequence in time, such as past to present or from the beginning to the end of an event. 7) Haddasah used an abbreviated version of her full-sentence outline for her speech. This is called a keyphrase outline. Answer: True Rationale: A keyphrase outline is a condensed version of a full-sentence outline, using keywords or phrases to represent the main points and supporting details of the speech. 8) Subordinate points are the major points that grow out of the thesis statement. Answer: False Rationale: Subordinate points are smaller points that support and expand upon the main points, rather than being the main points themselves. 9) Your ideas are said to be discrete if they have the ability to stand on their own. Answer: True Rationale: Discrete ideas are separate and distinct, able to stand on their own without relying on other ideas for context or support. 10) It is wise to use as many major points as you can in a classroom speech. Using five or more major points help you avoid treating the topic superficially. Answer: False Rationale: Using too many major points in a speech can overwhelm the audience and make it difficult to focus on the main ideas. It is generally recommended to limit major points to three or four to ensure depth and clarity in the presentation. 11) The introduction is the place where you strive to create a “need to know” for the audience. Answer: True Rationale: The introduction of a speech should grab the audience's attention and establish the relevance or "need to know" for the topic being discussed, setting the stage for the rest of the speech. 12) Jana called the audience to think further about the topic of her speech in her conclusion. This type of conclusion is called a challenge. Answer: True Rationale: A challenge conclusion encourages the audience to think or act in a certain way, often by presenting them with a challenge or call to action related to the topic of the speech. 13) One drawback in using a rhetorical question to grab the audience’s attention is that once the question is posed, the speaker must wait until the audience responds or answers. Answer: False Rationale: A rhetorical question is not meant to be answered by the audience, so the speaker does not need to wait for a response. It is used to engage the audience and prompt them to think about the topic. 14) Using a quotation during a speech introduction requires the speaker to take someone else’s exact words to support the ideas covered in the speech. Answer: True Rationale: When using a quotation in a speech introduction, the speaker must accurately quote someone else's words to provide authority, support, or context for the ideas being presented in the speech. 15) “My first main point” is an example of a signpost. Answer: True Rationale: Signposts are words or phrases used to indicate the organization and structure of a speech, such as transitions between main points or indicating the beginning of a new section. In this case, "My first main point" signals the start of a new main point in the speech. 13.4 Matching Questions For the questions that follow, match the word or phrase with its meaning. a) Introduces a speech by asking and then developing the answer later in the speech b) Major ideas of speech that grow out of the thesis statement c) Identifying a conflict and offering a course of action d) Minor points that grow out of the major ideas e) Chronological framework f) Order that helps create a logical flow of ideas g) The cause-and-effect format h) Breaking down main topic into smaller points i) Organizing according to the relationship of their positions j) Posed to the audience and later answered during speech k) Relates to the topic and gains audience attention by using shock or surprise 1) Coordinate points 2) Causal order 3) Problem/solution 4) Sequence 5) Startling statement 6) Spatial order 7) Rhetorical question 8) Subordinate points 9) Time order 10) Topic order Answers: 1) b 2) g 3) c 4) f 5) k 6) i 7) a 8) d 9) e 10) h 13.5 Essay Questions 1) List four ways to draw the audience’s attention during a speech introduction. Provide an example for each introduction using one of the following topics: turkeys, law enforcement, volunteerism, or social media. Answer: The four ways to draw an audience’s attention during a speech introduction are: (1) Narrative, (2) Startling Statement, (3) Rhetorical Question, or (4) Quotation. Examples (using “turkey” as the topic): Narrative: “I will never forget the time I prepared my first Thanksgiving Day turkey. The house smelled wonderful as the turkey baked in the oven. I was never so proud as when my father sat at the head of my beautifully decorated table and carved the turkey that I made for my family to share.” Startling Statement: There is nothing quite so delicious as eating a deep-fried turkey, but preparing this type of turkey comes at a price. According to the National Fire Protection Association, deep-fryer fires cause 5 deaths, 60 burn injuries, and 900 house fires, with property damages totaling more than 15 million dollars each year! Rhetorical Question: On June 20, 1782, the bald eagle was adopted as the official emblem of the United States of America. This decision disappointed Benjamin Franklin, who thought the turkey was a more honorable bird than the eagle. If Dr. Franklin had gotten his way all those years ago, would we all be eating eagle this Thanksgiving? Quotation: President Harry S. Truman once said, “I have no desire to crow over anybody or to see anybody eating crow, figuratively or otherwise. We should all get together and make a country in which everybody can eat turkey whenever he pleases.” 2) What is a full-sentence outline, and what is a key-phrase outline? What are the purposes of each outline? Answer: A full-sentence outline uses full sentences to list the major and minor points, as well as the different forms of support in your speech. The full-sentence outline serves to help develop the ideas in your speech. The key-phrase outline is an abbreviated version of the full-sentence outline and is intended as a cue to each point in your presentation. A keyphrase outline helps you prepare your speech delivery. 3) What are the main objectives of the introduction? Discuss several techniques that can be used to achieve those goals. Answer: The main objectives of the introduction are to (1) capture the audience’s attention, (2) establish your credibility, and (3) communicate the nature of your topic to the audience. Several ways to draw the audience’s attention include: a narrative, a startling statement, a rhetorical question, or a quotation. Establishing your credibility involves conveying your knowledge about the topic as well as your concern. In communicating the nature of your topic or purpose for giving your speech to the audience, you want to preview your main ideas while preserving the actual development of those ideas for the body of the speech. 4) List and describe five ways to organize the body of your speech. Which organizational pattern would best suit a speech on the dangers of texting on the phone while driving? Answer: Dunn and Goodnight discuss five ways to organize the body of your speech. (1) Causal order, or the cause-and-effect format, establishes the fact that certain events are linked to other events that have precipitated them. (2) The problem/solution approach identifies a conflict and then offers a potential course of action that will correct the problem. (3) Spatial order refers to organizing the parts of a topic according to the relationship of their positions. (4) Time order arranges ideas in a chronological framework. (5) Topic order involves breaking down your main topic into smaller points that are pertinent to the main idea. The best organization pattern to use for a speech on the dangers of texting on the phone while driving would be the problem/solution format. The problem is that some drivers text on the phone while driving, which takes their focus off of the road. The solution would be to implement laws to penalize drivers who text while driving, to serve as a deterrent. 5) What are the functions of the conclusion? Discuss three techniques used to achieve those goals: the summation, the challenge, and the call for action. Answer: The main functions of the conclusion are to (1) draw your speech to an end, (2) reiterate the central theme of your presentation (especially in an informative speech), and (3) indicate to the members of your audience what you would like them to do (especially in a persuasive speech). The summation reinforces the main points in your speech. The challenge calls on the audience to think further about the topic. The call for action asks the audience to go a step further than the challenge by actually doing something; become involved. In this type of conclusion, the speaker will have to tell the audience “how” they can become involved. Test Bank for Communication: Embracing Difference Daniel M. Dunn, Lisa J. Goodnight 9780205943661, 9780205865635, 9781269602877

Document Details

Related Documents

Close

Send listing report

highlight_off

You already reported this listing

The report is private and won't be shared with the owner

rotate_right

Select menu by going to Admin > Appearance > Menus

Close
rotate_right
Close

Send Message

image
Close

My favorites

image
Close

Application Form

image
Notifications visibility rotate_right Clear all Close close
image
image
arrow_left
arrow_right