Preview (9 of 27 pages)

Preview Extract

This Document Contains Chapters 1 to 10 CHAPTER 1 An Introduction to Recruitment and Selection If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn That: •the functions of recruitment and selection are part of an overall human resources management (HRM) system. •using HRM best practices in finding and hiring people will contribute to the overall success of an organization. •social and economic factors—such as global competition, the rapid advances in technology and the Internet, and the changing work force demographics—affect recruitment and selection. •human resources managers routinely face ethical dilemmas in recruitment and selection. Learning Outcomes: •Recognize the importance and relevance of recruitment and selection to Canadian organizations. [Apply] •Describe where recruitment and selection fit into the organization as a whole and the human resources management system in particular. [Remember] •Discuss strategic planning as applied to recruitment and selection. [Remember, Understand] •Explain how changes in both the external and internal environments have an impact on recruitment and selection. [Remember, Understand] •Identify which professional associations and groups in Canada have a stake in recruitment and selection. [Remember] •Outline basic ethical and professional issues in recruitment and selection. [Understand, Apply] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Effective recruitment and selection are important because they contribute to organizational performance and work force development. •Recruitment and selection practices play an essential strategic role in the staffing of contemporary organizations and to overall organizational effectiveness. •Effective human resources management, including recruitment and selection, must be carried out within the context of an organizational system and within the context of the external environment. •Students should gain experience dealing with ethical dilemmas that may arise in the HR profession, particularly in recruitment and selection. •Professional associations involved in recruitment and selection help legitimize the HR profession by, among other things, codifying ethical conduct. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Once they are in their careers as HR representatives, students will have a need to understand the importance of recruitment and selection to the overall success of an organization. •To be effective in their careers, students will need to recognize the importance of technology, global competition, changing work force demographics, and legislation, and how these influences are constantly impacting recruitment and selection. •Students will have to be aware of which professional associations and groups in Canada have a stake in recruitment and selection and the impact that gaining professional certification may have on their careers. •Students will require a strong grasp of how to deal with ethical situations in the recruitment and selection function. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? In-Class Quiz •Begin the class with a short “quiz” about students’ knowledge of recruitment and selection issues and compare their results with those of HR professionals. There are good sources for this sort of information in the extant literature. For example, Rynes, Colbert, and Brown (2002) showed that many HR professionals did not know the answers to important recruitment and selection questions. There are many questions in the article that can be used in class for demonstration purposes. Student Research •The professional associations described in Recruitment and Selection Today 1.2 have ethical codes that apply to their members. Have students visit the websites to learn more about these associations: CPHR (https://cphr.ca/), including their relevant member associations; Canadian Psychological Association (www.cpa.ca/), including the Canadian Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (http://www.cpa.ca/aboutcpa/cpasections/industrialorganizationalpsychology/). Guest Speakers •Invite HRM graduates and/or other recruitment and selection practitioners into the class to discuss how they started their career in human resources. Elicit answers to questions such as the following: Based on their educational backgrounds and work experiences, what career paths were available for them in their organization? What did they wish they had learned more about in their studies of HR? What events led to their success in business? Include in the discussion on how important the Chartered Professional in Human Resources (CPHR) designation is for getting a job in human resources and for pursuing opportunities for promotion (Recruitment and Selection Notebook 1.2). Group Discussion •Break up the class into groups of three or four to discuss how recruitment is different from selection; why recruitment and selection are so important to an organization; and what the term best practices means in recruitment and selection. Provide and ask for some examples. •Organize students in groups of three to four. Assign to each group an “ethical dilemma” related to recruitment and selection. These ethical dilemmas can be taken from those presented in the chapter or from other sources (real-life or hypothetical). Ask students to brainstorm in their small groups and share their ideas about how to deal with their ethical dilemma. Lead a wrap-up discussion with the entire group to identify some of the ethical issues that HR professionals will face when involved in recruitment and selection. Text Review •Ask students to review Figure 1.2, Talent Management Functions. Ask students to form groups of three or four to review each of the major functions of talent management. Ask each group to prepare a one-minute review to be delivered in class. Individual Research •Ask students to select three of the human resources–related organizations listed in Recruitment and Selection Notebook 1.4. Have them visit each source’s website to find information related to recruitment and selection. Ask students to be prepared to report on their findings. In a following class, have students report on their findings related to recruitment and selection from one of the organizations that they researched. Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-VcHu-wZxE: General information about recruitment and selection, January 12, 2014 www.youtube.com/watch?v=lc32fVdrCYI: Explains the recruitment and selection process, July 25, 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJNcYZvToGY: Recruitment information for small businesses, March 17, 2015 CHAPTER 2 Foundations of Recruitment and Selection I: Reliability and Validity If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn That: •personnel recruitment and selection strategies based on information obtained through scientific methods are more likely to benefit an organization than decisions based on impressions or intuition. •the basic concepts of reliability and validity underlie contemporary recruitment and selection practices. •different research methods and psychological measurement tools assist HR professionals in personnel selection. Learning Outcomes: •Understand the basic components that make up a traditional personnel selection model. [Understand] •Explain the concepts of reliability and validity. [Understand] •Recognize the importance and necessity of establishing the reliability and validity of measures used in personnel selection. [Apply] •Identify common strategies that are used to provide evidence on the reliability and validity of measures used in personnel selection. [Remember, Understand] •Discuss the requirement for measures used in personnel selection to evaluate applicants fairly and in an unbiased fashion. [Apply] •Describe the practical steps needed to develop a legally defensible selection system. [Remember] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Although students may not be immediately excited about statistical topics, the concepts of reliability and validity are critical in recruitment and selection testing because they are scientifically derived. •The accuracy of scientifically derived statements can be observed, critiqued, and used by others to predict which applicants will do well on the job. Such procedures are much more likely than gut feelings or intuition to produce results that meet legal requirements. •Being familiar with measurement, reliability, and validity issues, and using only procedures that will withstand legal scrutiny, helps HR professionals ensure that their selection procedures meet acceptable professional standards. •Students should know that they do not necessarily need to be statistical experts to be able to value the importance of reliable and valid instruments; there are practical steps in place that professionals can follow to develop a legally defensible recruitment and selection system. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Students need to realize that it is important to hire the best people based on the validity and reliability of the testing instruments used in the interview process, and that failing to do so may negatively impact organizational performance (and may also have negative legal consequences for the company). •Students need to be aware that recruiters should ensure that applicants are judged in a fair and unbiased manner, not only for moral reasons, but also for legal reasons. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •Ask the class to discuss the following ethical issue: Do individuals making staffing decisions have an ethical responsibility to know about measurement issues? Why or why not? (Responses will vary.) •Ask the following questions: What is your perception of fairness? Does an organization have an obligation to make an enterprise as profitable as possible on behalf of its owners, or should it meet the objectives of society by providing equal employment opportunities for members of different population groups? Group Discussion •Short opening vignette: Ask students to review the “Sham Psychometric Test” controversy at the beginning of the chapter. Break up the class into groups of three or four and have each group discuss the consequences of using a test that may or may not be valid. Review the issues of validity and reliability and discuss how they relate to the hiring process. Each group should choose a leader to communicate the responses that were discussed in the small groups. •In pairs or small groups, have students discuss a time when they experienced bias. Ask them to think of the first week of class and their first impressions of their teachers and/or peers. What biases were operating at that time? You can also discuss your first impressions of your students. •In groups of three or four, ask students to discuss an ethical situation they have encountered at work. Have them describe the situation and how the situation was handled. When students share their experiences in a large group discussion, interesting discussions will follow. Text Review •Review Figure 2.5, Validation Strategies, and compare the different types of validation strategies. It is important to be able to distinguish among these strategies to make informed HR decisions about testing instruments. •Review Figure 2.6, An Example of Range Restriction, and discuss. Student Activities •Direct students to Figure 2.1, Job Analysis, Selection, and Criterion Measurements of Performance: A Systems Approach, to review the steps involved in hiring a police constable. Ask the following questions: What are some of the major elements of the process? What questions do you have? Also ask students to review each of the steps in the selection process for the Toronto police in Recruitment and Selection Today 2.1. •Provide students with three columns of made-up data in a spreadsheet: one for cognitive ability scores, one for emotional intelligence scores, and one for performance. Here is an example: Using spreadsheet software (e.g., Excel) ask students to: 1. create a scatterplot of the data; 2. calculate a correlation between IQ scores and EQ scores; 3. calculate a correlation between IQ scores and performance; 4. calculate a correlation between EQ scores and performance; and 5. interpret the scores. Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—winto a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? CHAPTER 3 Foundations of Recruitment and Selection II: Legal Issues If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn That: •legal requirements, as formulated through significant legislation and case law, have an impact on the practice of recruitment and selection in Canada. •that human resources practitioners must become familiar with the human rights, employment equity standards, and labour laws that apply to their province or territory and to their municipal jurisdiction. Learning Objectives: •Discuss the major legal issues affecting recruitment and selection. [Understand] •Identify how relevant human rights and employment equity legislation and policies affect recruitment and selection in your organization. [Apply] •Understand and describe how legal concerns affect the practice of recruitment and selection. [Understand, Apply] •Discuss the key legal concepts that have had an impact on recruitment and selection in Canada. [Understand, Evaluate] •Apply the basic concepts and principles discussed in the chapter to the development of recruitment and selection systems that meet legal requirements. [Apply] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Given that recruitment and selection are crucially important HR activities for achieving diversity, human rights legislation and employment equity are here to stay. •A large segment of the Canadian work force is unionized, which means that labour codes and related legislation will affect recruitment and selection practices in many Canadian organizations. •Legislation changes require practitioners in recruitment and selection to regularly update their knowledge about and skills in legal issues. •Laws such as human rights and employment equity legislation mandate recruitment and selection practices that do not discriminate on the basis of specific characteristics. •This chapter presents the cases and rulings that have had the most significant impact on recruitment and selection in Canada. •This chapter gives some practical guidelines that will assist HR practitioners in developing recruitment and selection procedures that will meet with legal acceptance. •HR practitioners may need to educate management about the legal requirements that recruitment and selection systems must meet, namely, that the best way of staying out of legal trouble is to use reliable and valid selection systems. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •To be an asset to any company in HR, students must understand the impact that legal issues have on recruitment and selection. •Students will benefit long term from knowing how relevant human rights and employment equity legislation and policies affect recruitment and selection in an organization. •Students need to know and know how to explain the key legal concepts that have had an influence on recruitment and selection in Canada. •Students should know the practical guidelines in developing legally compliant recruitment and selection procedures. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •See Recruitment and Selection Notebook 3.1. Discuss the major areas of legislation affecting recruitment and selection. •Develop discriminatory and non-discriminatory interview questions. State these in class and have students vote to determine which questions are appropriate and which ones are not. See Table 3.3, Guidelines to Screening and Selection in Employment, for guidance. Student Research Have students visit the Canadian Human Rights Commission website (http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/eng). Instruct them to find and summarize three cases decided in the past year in favour of employers and three cases decided in favour of employees. Ask students to record the conclusions they formed from these cases. Which of the principles discussed in this chapter seem to underlie these decisions? Group Discussion •In groups of three or four, have students discuss the grounds for discrimination outlined in Section 8 of the Canadian Human Rights Act (refer to Table 3.1, Prohibited Grounds of Employment Discrimination in Canadian Jurisdictions). •Ask students to read the opening vignette, entitled “No Babies Allowed.” Have students work in groups of three or four to discuss this case as it relates to the information in one of the following: Recruitment and Selection Notebook 3.2 or Recruitment and Selection Notebook 3.3. Review Recruitment and Selection Notebooks 3.5, 3.6, and 3.7. Have students work in groups of three or four to discuss the concepts outlined and how they pertain to the case study. Have students choose a group leader to share the group’s discussion points. Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? CHAPTER 4 Job Analysis and Competency Models If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn That: •job and work analysis play an important role in HR development. •several job analysis techniques exist. •competency models may be used as an alternative procedure to job analysis. Learning Outcomes: •Recognize the importance of job analysis and the role it plays in recruitment and selection. [Remember, Understand] •Describe guidelines for conducting analyses employing a variety of job analysis techniques. [Remember, Understand] •Use standard tools and techniques to conduct a job analysis. [Apply] •Discuss the processes for identifying job specifications to be used in the recruitment and selection of human resources. [Understand, Apply] •Describe competencies and their role in recruitment and selection. [Understand, Remember] •Know how to identify competencies. [Apply] •Recognize the need to validate competency-based systems. [Understand, Remember] •Identify competency-based HR models from those based on job analysis. [Analyze] •Recognize best practices in competency modelling. [Understand, Remember] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •As the workplace rapidly changes with the introduction of new technologies and global competition, HR practitioners will need to combine organizational, work, and job analysis techniques to develop employee selection programs that lead to the selection and hiring of the best job candidates (i.e., the ones who will perform at the highest levels). •Job analysts must link job requirements to organization functioning to optimize recruitment and selection systems. •Several guidelines are provided that should help in choosing job-analysis or competency-based methods–or both–to identify KSAOs. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Job descriptions are important in the workplace with respect to recruitment and selection practices, performance management, and salary and benefits. •It is important that students can identify with the large nomenclature associated with job analysis. •It is important that students have an appreciation of the variety of methods of collecting information about job duties and responsibilities, including job analysis and competency-based models. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •Ask the class to break up into groups of four or five to discuss competencies. Ask them to discuss the following questions: (1) What are competencies? (2) Should competencies be used as the sole basis for hiring a candidate? Why or why not? (3) Would they like to fly on an airplane in which the pilot was selected only for his or her core competencies? Classroom Activity •Assign students one of the job analysis techniques and ask them to summarize the major elements of the technique along with its advantages and disadvantages. This work can be done as a homework assignment. When students return to class, have them break up into groups of four or five, according to the technique they chose. Have students discuss the technique. Then have them choose a leader to present their findings to the entire class. •See Recruitment and Selection Today 4.1. Have students review the licensed practical nurse (LPN) job description, and then discuss as a full class why this is a good job description. Point out to students the job title, key accountabilities/activities, major duties and responsibilities, working conditions, and the equal opportunity employer notice. Individual Research •Review Figure 4.1, Overview of Job Analysis Process and Outcomes. Ask students to interview a compensation analyst in a human resources department to discuss the organization’s mission statement, values, and goals. They should ask the HR professional for a copy of the organizational chart with detailed explanations of the reporting structures. •Instruct students to contact an HR professional to determine how his or her organization uses job analysis. Students should ask the HR professional for a copy of a job description and a copy of an internal job posting to achieve a better understanding of how job descriptions are used. Student Activities •Have students look up the job of human resources manager by referring to both the National Occupational Classification system and O*NET. Discuss the main duties and responsibilities obtained from these sources. •Ask students to find two job ads for a job analyst and two job ads for a job analyst supervisor/manager, focusing on at least two different industries. Have them identify the required competencies in each advertisement and highlight in one page the differences between the jobs related to competencies and the requirements (if any) based on the industry. Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA2WLI9bx5k: The Future of Talent Acquisition Through Disruption, October 23, 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvebAGerh88: The Best Recruiter at Google, October 23, 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULxZY0otQaw: Talent Acquisition: The True Definition of Partnership, October 28, 2016 (about the culture of recruiting at Netflix) CHAPTER 5 Recruitment, Selection, and Job Performance If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn: •That job performance plays an important role in recruitment and selection. •to define the differences among task, contextual, and counterproductive work behaviours. •the different types of counterproductive work behaviours. •to describe the importance of developing and using scientifically sound measures of job performance in selection and assessment. •to appreciate the technical aspects of measuring job performance. Learning Outcomes: •Recognize the important role played by job performance in selection and assessment. [Analyze] •Define the differences among task, contextual, and counterproductive work behaviours. [Understand, Remember] •Identify the different types of counterproductive work behaviours. [Understand] •Describe the importance of developing and using scientifically sound measures of job performance in selection and assessment. [Apply, Analyze] •Recognize what constitutes acceptable criteria for assessing performance. [Understand, Remember] •Explain the relationship among individual performance measures, criteria, and performance dimensions related to a job. [Understand, Remember] •Discuss the technical aspects of measuring job performance. [Analyze] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Job performance plays an important role in recruitment and selection. •Job performance and its measurement are an integral part of building a selection system that will meet professional and legal standards. •Understanding the factors that underlie job performance is necessary for using the performance model developed by Campbell. •The usefulness of any selection system is determined by how well it predicts job performance as measured by job-related criteria. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Students need to recognize that job-related performance is an integral part of the recruitment and selection process. •Students need to understand that the measurement of job performance may be used as a criterion in validating selection systems. •HR students may have to use several types of performance appraisal systems in their careers. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •See Figure 5.2, A Job Performance Domain for an Airplane Pilot. Lead a discussion by noting the job task behaviours, contextual behaviours, and counterproductive behaviours that relate to the performance of a pilot. Ask the following question: Which behaviours might be related to managing human resources? Consider the required professional capabilities. •See Figure 5.4, Examples of Graphic Rating Scales. Ask students if they have been evaluated on this type of scale. (Most students have been evaluated with the graphic rating scale.) Find examples of graphic rating scales on the Internet or use feedback forms from your academic institution (which are usually graphic rating scales), and share copies with students. Individual Research •Ask students to research different types of performance appraisal forms. As part of the research, students will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different performance appraisal forms. Which appraisal form is the best one to use with respect to reliability and validity? This research could be given as an assignment. •Instruct students to contact a human resources professional to determine how important employee performance is within his or her organization’s recruitment and selection procedures. Ask students to request a copy of the organization’s performance review process (including accompanying review tools, questionnaires, checklists, etc.). Group Discussion •Facilitate a discussion about the changes to the technologies used in performance appraisals in modern workplaces. For example, you may wish to discuss the rising use of wearable technology in police organizations (e.g., biofeedback, body cameras). Other organizations have started to use “tracking apps” to locate employees and gather other performance-related data. Divide students into groups of four or five and ask students what the benefits of these technologies might be in terms of measuring performance (e.g., collecting useful data quickly and efficiently with less human bias). What are the drawbacks (e.g., to employee privacy?) •See Table 5.1, The Relationship of Campbell’s Eight Job Dimensions to Task, Contextual, Adaptive, and Counterproductive Behaviour. Divide students into groups of four or five. Assign one performance dimension from Campbell’s model to each of the groups. Have students review the performance dimension, create an example that is different from the examples in the text, and share it with the class. •Ask students to list the many counterproductive behaviours that they have observed during their working lives. Examples of these include lying, theft, property damage, violence, engaging in risky behaviours, harassment of coworkers, sabotage, drug and alcohol use, and unsafe work practices. •Ask students to review several job postings in the HR field. Have them identify the behaviours that the organization is looking for in that particular job. Students should think about the following questions: Are there any performances that are expressed in relation to the organization’s mission and goals? How could the desired performance be measured? What criteria could be used? •In groups of four or five, ask students to conduct an Internet search and identify six to eight recruitment ads for human resources managers. Ideally, they should focus on two different industries and also different job ranks, such as VP of human resources, director of human resources, and manager of human resources. Instruct students to list the required competencies in each advertisement. Then have them write a report summarizing their findings and highlighting the differences across different organizations and job levels. Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2Cn8LWLdak: Don't Bury the Annual Performance Review: Andris Strazds at TEDxRiga, June 20, 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY8v-O5Buyc; HR Meets Science at Google with Prasad Setty, November 14, 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6pyt4-_qvA: What Is HR Analytics? May 13, 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziUGffMFlfw; Google's Using People Data to Make Happier, More Effective Employees, November 11, 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7ufb_naP84: The Latest Wearable Technology Optimizing Performance for Elite Athletes, June 16, 2016. Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? CHAPTER 6 Recruitment: The First Step in the Selection Process If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn: •how to attract and retain the most qualified applicants for a job position. •the importance of job descriptions when in the recruitment and selection function. •the internal and external factors that affect the recruitment and selection function. •how to design and implement a recruitment action plan. •the variety of internal and external recruiting methods. Learning Outcomes: •Discuss recruitment as part of an organization’s strategic plan. [Analyze] •Recognize the link between recruitment and selection. [Understand, Remember] •Describe the characteristics of the job and organization are influential in attracting job applicants. [Analyze] •Explain the role that accurate expectations play in developing a fit between a person and an organization. [Understand, Remember] •Identify the internal and external factors that influence an organization’s recruitment strategy. [Understand, Remember] •Design and implement a recruitment action plan. [Create] •Identify the different methods that can be used to recruit internal and external job applicants. [Understand, Remember] •Recognize the increasingly important role played by the Internet and social media in recruiting. [Understand, Remember] •Discuss why a realistic job preview may benefit both the job seeker and the organization. •Appreciate the need to evaluate the effectiveness of different recruitment methods. [Evaluate, Create] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Recruitment is the first step in the hiring process. •Effective recruitment is able to attract and retain the most suitable applicants. •The right person for the job depends on the person’s technical skills and personal suitability for the position. •HR planners must consider both the internal and external constraints in the organization. •Every recruitment strategy must contain an action plan. •HR professionals must know the effectiveness of different recruiting methods and build methods into their recruitment strategy plans for evaluating the recruiting outcomes. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Students need to make the link between recruitment and selection. •It is important that students appreciate how the characteristics of the job and the organization are influential in attracting job applicants. •Students will benefit from a clear understanding of the role that accurate expectations play in developing a fit between a person and an organization. •Students need to be aware of how the internal and external factors influence an organization’s recruitment strategy. •Students need to be able to design and implement a recruitment action plan. •It is important for students to understand why realistic job previews may benefit both the job seeker and the organization. •It is important that students appreciate the need to evaluate the effectiveness of different recruitment methods. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •Review Figure 6.1, Recruitment as Part of the HR Planning Process, and Figure 6.2, Example of a Succession/Replacement Plan for a Chief Financial Officer. Ask students the following questions: How does recruitment fit in to human resources planning? How does succession planning relate to recruitment? In other words, how are Figure 6.1 and Figure 6.2 related to one another? Group Discussion •Divide students into groups of four to six students to discuss the following questions: 1. What impact does the growing diversity of employees in the Canadian labour market have on recruitment? Do you think that people who were born elsewhere and who have moved to Canada are more or less likely to take part-time or contracted work than people who were born in Canada? 2. There has been considerable growth in the use of contingent or part-time workers over the past decade. Why do you think companies are doing this? What impact do you think using contingent or part-time workers will have on recruitment? 3. What is outsourcing? Which HR functions could possibly be outsourced? Individual Research •Examine the recruiting advertisements of two similar service-oriented organizations. Then go to the companies’ websites and examine their stated human resources and employee development policies. Answer the following questions: 1. Can you tell anything from the job ads about the companies’ mission and values? 2. What are the similarities and differences of the required competencies in the job ads? 3. Are the messages in their print ads consistent with the statements in their websites? •Visit the website of an organization for which you have worked or which you attended as a student. What kind of image is the organization trying to portray? Is it working? •Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) has more than 300 service outlets and offers a variety of programs to employers and job applicants, including a job bank, labour market information, and information about foreign workers. Several useful tools for employers are listed below. Employment and Social Development Canada: https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development.html Job Bank: http://www.jobbank.gc.ca/ Canadian Labour Congress: http://www.canadianlabour.ca/ Individual Exercise •Ask students to identify the interests and values influencing their employment search right now. As a guideline, have students review the following questions: What are some of your priorities that are affecting what you want to do and where you want to work? What methods and techniques have you used in a job search? What has worked and what hasn’t worked for you in the past? Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-baHBzWe4k: How to: Work at Google—How We Hire, December 9, 2016 CHAPTER 7 Selection I: Applicant Screening If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn: •to know the differences between employee screening and employee selection. •how to write a résumé and cover letter. •the legal implications in the screening and employee selection process. •why referencing is used in the employee selection process. Learning Outcomes: •Recognize the difference between employee screening and employee selection. [Remember, Understand] •Describe the advantages and disadvantages associated with screening tools, such as application forms, biographical information blanks, reference/background checks, résumés, video résumés, social networking sites, and virtual job auditions. [Remember, Understand] •Discuss the legal status of these screening tools and the extent to which they are predictive of performance. [Understand] •Design an effective multiphase screening program appropriate to the position requirements for any target job. [Create, Evaluate] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Organizations must be staffed with people capable not only of doing the work required but also of doing that work well. •There is a marked difference between screening and selection, and HR professionals must understand these differences. •The widely used screening tools have both advantages and disadvantages. •Legal implications exist in the screening and selection of applicants. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •It is important that students appreciate that organizations must be staffed with people capable not only of doing the work required but also of doing that work well. •Students should understand the difference between screening and selection. •Students need to recognize and appreciate the various screening methods. •Students will benefit from understanding the impact that past behaviours have on future job performance. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Student Research •Ask students to review several different job advertisements to identify and highlight the minimum qualifications outlined in each. What are the knowledge, skills, abilities, experiences, and other attributes outlined in the ad? Guest Speaker •Invite an employment counsellor from the educational institution’s career centre to come to class to give students tips on writing résumés and cover letters. Ask students to submit their résumés and cover letters. Student Activity •Instruct students to participate in a mock interview to practise their skills both as an interviewer and as an interviewee (job candidate). Find an HR job ad and create a variety of interview questions. Text Review •Review the material provided in the text to determine the benefits of and concerns about weighted application blanks and when to use them. Web Research •From the Internet, have students collect job application forms for a bank, an insurance company, an airline, and a manufacturing unit. Ask students the following questions: What do all these forms have in common? What differences are there? How do you account for these differences? Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohTbCZ-faSE: Screening Applicants, MaRS Entrepreneurship Programs, December 11, 2014 www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPHVeQ7-ynA: Mark Zuckerberg: Hiring the Right People, May 23, 2011 www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D357Q6RRF4: A Recruiter’s Magic Question..., March 22, 2012 CHAPTER 8 Selection II: Testing and Other Assessments If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn: •the forms of testing that are used in personnel selection. •the specific background material that is required on the technical, ethical, and legal requirements governing the use of employment tests. •the different testing procedures described in the chapter. Learning Outcomes: •Identify commonly used assessments in HR selection. [Understand, Apply] •Describe the advantages and disadvantages of using these assessments. [Understand, Remember] •Explain the importance of the validity and utility of HR assessments. [Understand, Remember] •Discuss how people undergoing these assessments view them and how these views impact their perceptions of the organization's attractiveness. (Evaluate, Analyze) •Summarize the legal issues surrounding the use of HR assessments. (Understand, Remember) Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Those with roles in recruitment and selection must appreciate the different types of tests. •Students should understand the reliability and validity of these tests and when and how these tests are used in recruitment and selection. •HR students must recognize the legal implications of employment testing. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Students need to be able to apply the different types of employment tests used in screening and interviewing processes. •It is important that students understand the value of these tests for employment purposes. •Students must appreciate how job applicants view the use of different employment tests. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Class Discussion •Have students recall and relate times that they have had to submit work samples or conduct a work simulation when applying for a job. Ask them to describe their experience with this process. •Many employers use tests. Ask students the following questions: What factors have led to the popularity of tests? In your opinion, is this a good trend? Guest Speakers •Invite to class someone who advocates for employment of individuals with disabilities. Discuss some of the barriers to employment that these individuals face, particularly at the screening stage in the selection process. Individual Research •Instruct students to collect information about one type of test offered by at least two different testing agencies or publishers. What psychometric data about the tests is available from the test publishers? What information is lacking? Which test package seems more complete? Web Research •Visit the website of the Personnel Psychology Centre for testing information and sample tests. Tests can be used both for recruiting purposes and for new hires after they have joined the organization. The Personnel Psychology Centre’s testing notes that tests are particularly helpful for selecting individuals for an entry-level position, making differential job assignments, promoting individuals from within, and identifying employees with training potential. •There are a variety of popular tests. Visit www.queendom.com/tests and explore the different kinds of tests offered. •Ask students to complete an online version of the Big Five personality test by visiting the website www.outofservice.com/bigfive. Refer to the test for more information. •Ask students to take the test of cognitive ability. How do you compare to NFL players on the Wonderlic? Determine for yourself by taking an on-line version of the test here at http://footballiqscore.com/. Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gpa6p0f5ArM: Interviewing Training Video—Hire for Attitude, January 2, 2014 www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzUNnm1Z_cw: Four Seasons Recruitment—An Animated Guide to Your First Day, December 6, 2011 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6nVuwr31wQ: A Day at the Assessment Centre, July 31, 2013 CHAPTER 9 Selection III: Interviewing If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn: •the purposes and uses of employment interviews. •the different steps in the interview process. •the advantages and disadvantages of unstructured and structured interviews. •the legal implications in the interviewing process. •how to write behavioural questions for the interviewing process. Learning Outcomes: •Recognize the purposes and uses of employment interviews. [Understand, Remember] •Identify the multiple phases of the employment interview and the factors affecting employment interview decisions. [Remember] •Describe the selection errors associated with traditional approaches to employment interviewing. [Apply] •Discuss the elements of employment interview structuring. [Understand, Remember] •Identify different structured interviewing techniques and their relative advantages and disadvantages. [Understand, Remember] •Explain the legal and predictive advantages of structured employment interviewing methods. [Apply] •Develop competence in the design of effective interview questions and scoring guides. [Evaluate] •Discuss innovations and future directions in interview research and practice. [Understand, Remember] •Recognize the role of employment interviews in the changing organizational environment. [Evaluate] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Employment interviews are the most popular selection procedure among employers and employees. •Interviews are one of the many ways to screen the best applicant for the job. •There are many different types of interviewing techniques. •Students should be aware of the types of interview questions that are asked. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •HR students need to understand the purposes and uses of employment interviews. •Students pursuing careers in human resources will benefit from having an understanding of the selection errors associated with traditional approaches to employment interviewing. •HR students must have a grasp of the elements of employment interview structuring in order to succeed. •Students of HR will benefit from learning the advantages and disadvantages of the structured employment interview. •It is essential that students recognize the legal implications of the structured employment interview. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •See Figure 9.1, A Model of the Core Processes of the Interview and Its Contexts. Ask students to think about a time when the outcome of an employment interview seemed to be strongly dominated by the impression that the interviewer had of them. What were the characteristics of their most positive employment interview experience and of their worst interview experience? How did the behaviour of the interviewer influence these experiences? •See Recruitment and Selection Today 9.4. Ask students to discuss the interviews they have experienced that have used some or all of these questions. Ask them to list all of the “worst interview questions” that they can recollect. Managers among your students can also identify “worst interviews” and times that a job interview did not go well. Group Discussion •Have students work in groups of three or four to review a job description and design a series of interview questions from the job description. These questions would include open-ended, closed-ended, behavioural, and situational questions. Once the questions have been designed in the small groups, discuss the questions as a class. •Find a job description for an HR generalist position. Have students work in pairs, with one developing a variety of employment questions and conducting a structured interview and the other being the interviewee. Refer students to Recruitment and Selection Notebook 9.3 as a guideline. Ask them to prepare a reflective analysis of how they felt being the interviewer or the interviewee. Individual Research •Instruct students to use the Internet to research and answer the following question: How valid and reliable is the employment interview today? Keep in mind the structured interview with behavioural-based questions that the recruiter would ask the applicant. Web Research •For more information about preparing for a job interview, visit www.interviewcoach.com. •For more information about résumés, cover letters, and interview techniques, visit www.susanireland.com, or your own choice of website (there are many). •Visit the websites of three medium-size to large firms, each from a different industry, and note their hiring policies and preliminary screening criteria/process. For maximum variation, select some high-tech and some traditional industries. What commonalities do you see? What differences? Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Additional Resources: Suggested Resources for Instructors Video Clips www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBiKsWrOy_g: Best of the Bunch—Recruitment & Selection, February 12, 2013 (provides step-by-step information on the interview process) www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsUGaSL6fnc: HR Interview Preparation—Tell Me About Yourself, September 13, 2014 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lqamzP7YHo: MMI Multiple Mini Interview Splits Questions and Answers, April 19, 2011 CHAPTER 10 Decision Making If Nothing Else, Students Should Learn: •the steps in the selection process once the decision is made. •the different decision-making models. •how to make decisions individually and in groups. •how to create a process for establishing cutoff scores. Learning Outcomes: •Recognize the complexity of decision making in the employee selection context. [Understand, Remember] •Identify the sources of common decision-making errors in employee selection. [Understand, Remember] •Distinguish between judgmental and statistical approaches to the collection and combination of applicant information. [Analyze] •Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various decision-making models. [Understand, Remember] •Identify issues involved with group decision making. [Understand] •Describe the basic principles in the application of cutoff scores, banding, and top-down selection. [Understand, Remember] •Summarize the factors that need to be considered in making a job offer. [Understand, Remember] •Explain the role of letters of employment and employment contracts in the job offer process. [Analyze] •Analyze the issues and legal concerns, as well as potential dangers, that need to be considered in drafting and/or signing letters of employment or employment contracts. [Analyze] •Discuss the benefits of using best practices in recruitment and selection. [Analyze] Key Concepts: Why Is This Chapter Important to HR Students? •Students learn how to make appropriate decisions. •HR students must learn the skills needed to make decisions individually and in groups. •Students must be confident with and understand the group decision-making process and its dynamics. Student Motivation: Why Should Students Care? •Human resources students must appreciate the complexity of decision making in the employment selection context. •Students need to be comfortable with the group decision-making process. •In order to be successful in a human resources career, HR students require a clear understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of various decision-making models. •Students will benefit from having a grasp of the basic principles in the application of cutoff scores, banding, and top-down selection. Engagement Strategies: What Can I Do in Class? Classroom Discussion •Have students brainstorm some of the challenges facing human resources specialists in the recruitment and selection field. Group Discussion •Break up students into groups of three or four. Ask them to develop a training program on decision making in the selection process. What content would they cover in the program? How would they address the participants’ desire to continue to make decisions based on gut feelings or instinct? •Review Recruitment and Selection Notebook 10.1. Ask students to form groups of three or four to discuss the seven elements involved in making a final selection decision. Formulate questions about the “muddiest point.” Individual Research •Ask students to conduct a search of five MBA programs in Canada and to make a note of their admission criteria and requirements, including stated cutoff scores for standardized admission tests (e.g., GMAT or TOEFL). What similarities and differences do they see among the business schools? Assessment Tools: What Other Resources Are Available? Other assessment tools include a Test Bank of multiple choice questions, true/false questions, short-answer questions; PowerPoint® slides; and MindTap, a fully online learning solution that combines all student learning tools—readings, multimedia, activities, and assessments—into a single Learning Path that guides the student through the curriculum. Reflections on Teaching: How Can I Assess My Own “Performance”? Good teaching requires ongoing self-assessment and reflection. At the completion of this lesson, you may find it helpful to reflect on the following, and consider whether you want or need to make any adjustments for subsequent lessons. •What worked in this lesson? What didn’t? •Were students engaged? Were they focused or did they go off on tangents? •Did I take steps to adequately assess student learning? •Did my assessments suggest that they understood the key concepts? •What (if anything) should I do differently next time? •How can I gather student feedback? •How can I use this feedback for continuous improvement of my teaching? Instructor Manual for Recruitment and Selection in Canada Victor M. Catano, Rick D. Hackett, Willi H. Wiesner 9780176764661, 9780176570316, 9780176504373

Document Details

Close

Send listing report

highlight_off

You already reported this listing

The report is private and won't be shared with the owner

rotate_right
Close
rotate_right
Close

Send Message

image
Close

My favorites

image
Close

Application Form

image
Notifications visibility rotate_right Clear all Close close
image
image
arrow_left
arrow_right